Tag Archives: Communication

Is it true that those who can’t speak, write?

We’ve all heard the expression “those who can’t do, teach”. That got me thinking about writers, and more specifically about why we write. I want to open this post by asking if any of my fellow writers out there have issues with speaking?

All through my childhood I had a slight lisp, a tendency to stammer when nervous, and a problem with diction because of an injury to my tongue. Most of the time I avoided speaking because I found that I was never able to communicate my ideas successfully. I was also one of those people who could never think of something to say. I never liked getting involved in debates because I wouldn’t be able to think of an appropriate comeback until days later, and by that point it was useless. Writing offered me a method of communication which wasn’t dependent on my speaking ability, so I think that was one of the things that first appealed to me.

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The stresses of speaking

How about you? Do you have any speech problems? If so, do you think that it was one of the things that first got you interested in writing? Do you think that having a problem with speaking can help writers?

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Exercise of the Day: Freewrite
Write for 5 to 10 minutes without editing using this as your starting point.
“Some say that absence makes the heart grow fonder but it doesn’t. Absence makes the heart grow numb.”

To make things more interesting, after you’ve done your freewrite pass on what you’ve written to someone else and have them continue the story. This is another version of a game we used to play in my creative writing class called “writer’s tennis”. Have fun!! I will see you around!!

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Filed under Books, Creative, Creative writing, Fiction, Journalism, Literature, Nanowrimo, Novel Writing, Novels, Playwriting, Screenwriting, Uncategorlzed, Writing, writing prompt, writing tips

5 Bad Habits for Writers and the Lessons they Teach Us

Bad Writing Habits

It's only human to have bad habits, but that doesn't mean we can't overcome them!

It’s only human to have bad habits, but that doesn’t mean we can’t overcome them!

We all know that everyone has bad habits and writers are no exception. The trick to becoming a better writer is the ability to recognize your issues and address them. These are just a few of the habits I’ve recognized in my own writing and the ways I’ve tried to overcome them.

 1. Too many repetitions:

Over and over and over and over and over...

Over and over and over and over and over…

There is absolutely no problem with using key words for emphasis, but if you use the words too many times in a short span it can be a bit confusing for a reader. Have you ever read something where one word gets used too many times in succession? I used to have a job editing research papers for college students and a lot of the students had that habit. One student was writing a short 100 word paper on society and used the word “sociology” approximately 40 times. Trying to read that paper was very difficult because it felt like a swirling vortex of chaos centered on that one word. Lesson learned from this bad habit: Emphasis is one of the central dramatic tools of writers but it cannot be achieved by constant repetition. Use a thesaurus to help you find new words and expressions.

 2. Arrogance:

You get further talking to people than at them.

You get further talking to people than at them.

In order to be a great writer you need to set your ego aside. How can you ever attempt to edit your work if you’re so wrapped up in your ego that you think everything you’ve written is golden merely because you wrote it? Humbleness also helps you to keep your sanity through things like getting rejected by publishers and negative reviews. Also your readers are most likely not going to respond well to your writing style if they feel like you are patronizing, belittling or speaking down to them. Ego is one of the writer’s worst enemies. Lesson learned from this bad habit: It’s a fact that not everyone is going to like your writing and putting your ego aside really helps you survive the entire process of writing.

 3. Trying to sound like other writers:

Trying to copy another writers voice doesn't work. You are not them. You are you. OWN IT

Trying to copy another writers voice doesn’t work. You are not them. You are you. OWN IT

A lot of writers when they first start writing attempt, whether consciously or unconsciously, to tailor their words to sound like other established writers. In order to have a long and productive career as a writer you need to establish your own unique voice and to make it strong. Assert it! Be proud of it! It is your writing, written in your voice!!!!  Lesson learned from this bad habit: Though you can look to older and more established writers for some advice, you cannot attempt to copy or reproduce their voice in your work. It is your work. Own it.

 4. Getting too defensive about criticism:

criticism

I know I’ve spoken about this before but this is one of the worst habits for a lot of writers. When you’ve finished writing something it feels like you’ve given birth to something and even if you try to detach yourself a bit, you feel like it’s your baby and that can make you blind to its faults. Too you your book’s perfect so when it gets criticism, you run the risk of getting angry and defensive because it feels like your baby is being attacked. It’s a fact of writing that not everyone is going to like what your write or get your message. Learn to deal because sometimes the critics are right. Lesson learned from this bad habit: Criticism can be hard to hear but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t listen. If you listen to the negative critics all the time you will never get anything written because you will think everything you write is awful. If you never listen to the “haters” you will think everything you write is great even if it has serious problems.

 5. Refusing to learn:

learning2

No writer, no matter how many books they’ve written, can say they have learned it all. To learn is to live and to grow. The moment you decide to stop learning that is also the day you should stop writing. Do research, experiment and be open to discovering new facts, emotions and characters. Lesson learned from this bad habit: To learn is to live. For writers to live is to write. The moment you stop learning your writing withers. I like to use my local library’s reference section to do research and discover new and interesting things I am not that knowledgeable about.

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day: The Science Experiment

Write a scene where you and your best friend are working on a chemistry experiment. Something goes wrong with the experiment and though you look and feel fine, something is going wrong for your friend. Write about what is happening to them. What is happening? How do they look? Does it hurt? Are they changing? If they are changing what are they changing into?

 

Have fun with this exercise and I’ll talk to you later!! Feel free to comment/like/reblog.

 

 

 

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Filed under Characters, Creative, Creative writing, Dialogue, Ideas, Imagination, Literature, Novel Writing, Playwriting, Plot, Screenwriting, Uncategorized, Writing

What is Your Favorite Writing Exercise?

What’s the BEST Writing Exercise

Writing Takes a lot of muscle and you cannot be afraid to EXERCISE!!

Writing Takes a lot of muscle and you cannot be afraid to EXERCISE!!

Writing exercises are one of the best ways to keep your “idea generating muscles” in shape. If you want to hone any skill what do you need to do? You need to practice practice practice!!!!!  Loyal readers of this blog will know, I like to put a little creative writing exercise at the end of every post. I wanted to ask all of you, what are a few of your favorite exercises? What writing prompts have you found really get your juices flowing? Comment below!!!

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude" ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

“The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude” ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Thanks a lot! I want you to know I appreciate every blog like, every comment, reblog, and follower I get. You rock!!!!

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day: The Accent Exercise

Write a description of a place or an object with an accent that is NOT your own.  What turns of phrase and weird pronunciations does that character use? The trick with this exercise is to not make the character seem cartoon-ish. This exercise trains you to think in a way that is unlike yourself without mocking.

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Filed under Characters, Creative, Creative writing, Dialogue, Drama, Ideas, Imagination, Literature, Novel Writing, Playwriting, Plot, Screenwriting, Uncategorized, Writing

3 Essential Questions to Ask Before You Post Anything Online

Write like the Wind

“It is wise to apply the oil of refined politeness to the mechanisms of friendship” ~ Colette

In today’s digital age where you can post anything you want across a variety of media, Facebook, widgets, chat rooms, in a matter of seconds many are falling victim to their own posts. In today’s digital world everything seems to be centered on speed. We’ve got to get the tech faster so we can live our lives faster. FASTER!!! FASTER!!! FASTER!!!! The issue is when people can communicate faster they often times do not send their intended message clearly. Taking more time gives people more time to think and to answer some essential questions. If you want to avoid awkward encounters with friends, bosses, coworkers or anyone else in your digital world please do yourself a favor and ask yourself these three questions before you post anything online.

There are no emoticons to accurately translate SARCASM

There are no emoticons to accurately translate SARCASM

1. Does this need to be said (Am I really saying what I mean)? 

Sure you theoretically can write a comment or blog post where you trash talk your boss but just being able to do something does not mean you should. If you’ve gotten though the first half of this question and decided that yes, your message is one that needs to be put out there, you had better take at least a moment or two and make sure that you are delivering it clearly. Oh and for all of my friends who are fans of sarcasm remember that without the usage of emoticons sarcasm never comes across well online.

hyopcrisy

2. Does this need to be said by me?

Sure certain messages might be needed, but you might not be the one to say it. For example, if you constantly post pictures of yourself getting drunk and partying, you might not be the one to tell your friend that they need to go to AA meetings. The message there might be a good one, but in that situation chances are your friend wouldn’t take it seriously because it came from you.

Timing is Everything!!

Timing is Everything!!

3. Is my message something I need to say now?

If you gotten though the first steps and have come to the conclusion that yes the message needs to be said you you’re the one to do it, you need to remember that timing is key in every aspect of communication. For example say your friend’s grandmother just died and they’ve been posting about it all day, that is probably not a good day to post a funny joke onto their Facebook wall. Maybe the joke is good and on most days your friend would enjoy it, but you’ve got to think of what kind of mental/emotional state your friend is in and if they’re likely to take the joke well.   “Sometimes being a friend means mastering the art of timing. There is a time for silence. A time to let go and allow people to hurl themselves into their own destiny.” ~ Octavia Butler

If you keep these few questions in mind when you attempt to communicate online, you will be far less likely to say something you don’t mean and you’ll also be more capable of saying the things you mean clearly.

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the day:  The 20 Years Exercise

Pick your favorite romantic couple from literature, film, television etc, and write a short story describing their lives 20 years after the end of their story. For example if we ignore the things that happened in Scarlett, the sequel to Gone with the Wind, what might Rhett Butler and Scarlett’s lives be like? Would they have gotten back together? If Romeo and Juliet had lived would they have stayed in love? Just pick a pair and have some fun with it!

So long for now folks!!!!

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Why Writers Need to be Packrats: Never Throw Away Your Ideas

Well hello stranger! I am so sorry for the long wait, but unfortunately Hurricane Sandy messed up my online writing plans last year. Being without electricity for extended periods of time? I don’t recommend it. LOL!!! Unfortunately writing took a backseat to survival, but even without electricity I did take some time to work on my writing skills. I went back through my old box of ideas just to see what I could make of things. Speaking of which…

We’ve all seen that stereotypical picture of a writer living in a ramshackle apartment with papers and notebooks piled from floor ceiling. Well, for my money that’s not too far from the truth. I never throw out anything I write, even if it’s not that great. If you want to learn and grow as a writer one of the best pieces of advice you can get is to be a packrat. Say you write a bit of a short story and it doesn’t feel like it works at all, just because that idea didn’t work out now that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to use it in the future.

Despite the fact that there are some writers in the world who seem like they can pump out books like a sausage grinder, for most writers in the world every day is a struggle. Even if you have the best ideas in the world, it can still be a war to translate ideas into stories. I’ve got flash drives and old notebooks piled up that are full of old poems, novels and plays that I started but the stories just never got off the ground. A few of those ideas were really weak when I first tried to write them, but a few years later I was able to take them and shape them into something.

At least once a year, if not more frequently, I pull out a few of my old ideas and try them again. I tweak this or that and try to write the story from a new perspective. Sometimes I get inspiration and I can write more. Once there was a play that I hadn’t touched in five years, but when I pulled it out I just had a spark and I finished it! You can never really give up on your ideas, just save them. In time your perspective might change or you might see or experience something you can use to finish it.

It’s true, when you write that not all of your ideas are going to pan out the first time, but that doesn’t mean you have to give up on it. Writing is a struggle and sometimes it’s more like torture, but it makes the victories that much sweeter!!

That’s it from me for today folks!! Ta-ta for now!

Writing Exercise for the Day: The Curtains

Write a story where a husband and wife are buying new curtains. With this scene all your characters can talk about verbally is the curtains but underneath that they are having a conversation about an issue in their relationship (ie pregnancy, divorce, infidelity). When you’re done go back over the scene and see if the couple’s issue was made clear.

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