Monthly Archives: September 2013

What is Your Favorite Writing Exercise?

What’s the BEST Writing Exercise

Writing Takes a lot of muscle and you cannot be afraid to EXERCISE!!

Writing Takes a lot of muscle and you cannot be afraid to EXERCISE!!

Writing exercises are one of the best ways to keep your “idea generating muscles” in shape. If you want to hone any skill what do you need to do? You need to practice practice practice!!!!!  Loyal readers of this blog will know, I like to put a little creative writing exercise at the end of every post. I wanted to ask all of you, what are a few of your favorite exercises? What writing prompts have you found really get your juices flowing? Comment below!!!

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude" ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

“The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude” ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Thanks a lot! I want you to know I appreciate every blog like, every comment, reblog, and follower I get. You rock!!!!

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day: The Accent Exercise

Write a description of a place or an object with an accent that is NOT your own.  What turns of phrase and weird pronunciations does that character use? The trick with this exercise is to not make the character seem cartoon-ish. This exercise trains you to think in a way that is unlike yourself without mocking.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Characters, Creative, Creative writing, Dialogue, Drama, Ideas, Imagination, Literature, Novel Writing, Playwriting, Plot, Screenwriting, Uncategorized, Writing

How to Use Drama to Connect with Your Audience and Further Your Plot

Write like the Wind

No matter how much they say they hate it, human beings love drama and do everything they can to create it. Think about it, if someone is trying to tell a story, either verbally or in stories, they try to bump up the drama of even the most mundane events. Writers use the exaggeration of ordinary events as a way to impress a sense of drama onto the readers. When writers do that they are offering the readers a little slice of drama which, because of it innately commonplace nature, offers the readers something they can easily relate to their own lives. Being able to give your readers something which is easily relatable gives them an easy way to connect to your story.

DRAMA MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND

DRAMA MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND

Let’s say that your main character had to wait fifteen minutes to get a table at a restaurant. They might say something like, “I can’t believe I had to wait a whole fifteen minutes just to get a table”. With the words “I can’t believe” and “a whole fifteen minutes” the author lets the reader know that while a fifteen minute wait isn’t outside the realm of possibility, it is long enough for the character to have decided that it was too long. Also, since having a fifteen minute wait at a restaurant is something which could happen any day of the week to anyone so your readers might read that and go “oh yeah I had to wait a long time to get a table last week too” and that way your reader has an easy way to connect the story to their lives.

Bad Drama = Dead Weight

Bad Drama = Dead Weight

Although human beings enjoy dramatizing events writers have to remember that there is good drama and bad drama. Good drama has a point and a purpose. It is created for a specific means like furthering the plot or adding levels of character development. Bad drama has no real purpose like an over the top sex scene or violence. Bad drama may get your story publicity or hype but if it doesn’t move the story it really has no place. To dramatize our lives is only human but as for writing if the drama doesn’t advance the plot or help to develop the characters chances are it is only going to be a dead weight.

Timing is Everything!!

Timing is Everything!!

The real trick of knowing when to use dramatization is learning when it’s appropriate. Drama, in order for it to sound natural, has to be formulated around the story. If the dramatic isn’t based on a strong foundation it’s sort of like an author who puts a joke in his book just because he thinks it’s funny. Think about it, that joke might be funny on its own but if it doesn’t fit that particular scene, the character or the tone of the book as a whole it is most likely going to seem out of place.

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day: Alien Visitor

Imagine that your narrator is an alien visitor from outer space. Write a short story which describes the alien’s experiences when they first land. What would the alien think of Earth? How would they describe the Earth and its inhabitants?

Fellow Sci-Fi Lovers Unite!!! THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE!!!

Fellow Sci-Fi Lovers Unite!!! THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE!!!

Have fun with this alien inspired exercise and I will talk to you next time!!! Feel free to comment, follow, or share this post!!

2 Comments

Filed under Characters, Creative, Creative writing, Dialogue, Drama, Ideas, Imagination, Literature, Novel Writing, Playwriting, Plot, Screenwriting, Uncategorized, Writing

3 Essential Questions to Ask Before You Post Anything Online

Write like the Wind

“It is wise to apply the oil of refined politeness to the mechanisms of friendship” ~ Colette

In today’s digital age where you can post anything you want across a variety of media, Facebook, widgets, chat rooms, in a matter of seconds many are falling victim to their own posts. In today’s digital world everything seems to be centered on speed. We’ve got to get the tech faster so we can live our lives faster. FASTER!!! FASTER!!! FASTER!!!! The issue is when people can communicate faster they often times do not send their intended message clearly. Taking more time gives people more time to think and to answer some essential questions. If you want to avoid awkward encounters with friends, bosses, coworkers or anyone else in your digital world please do yourself a favor and ask yourself these three questions before you post anything online.

There are no emoticons to accurately translate SARCASM

There are no emoticons to accurately translate SARCASM

1. Does this need to be said (Am I really saying what I mean)? 

Sure you theoretically can write a comment or blog post where you trash talk your boss but just being able to do something does not mean you should. If you’ve gotten though the first half of this question and decided that yes, your message is one that needs to be put out there, you had better take at least a moment or two and make sure that you are delivering it clearly. Oh and for all of my friends who are fans of sarcasm remember that without the usage of emoticons sarcasm never comes across well online.

hyopcrisy

2. Does this need to be said by me?

Sure certain messages might be needed, but you might not be the one to say it. For example, if you constantly post pictures of yourself getting drunk and partying, you might not be the one to tell your friend that they need to go to AA meetings. The message there might be a good one, but in that situation chances are your friend wouldn’t take it seriously because it came from you.

Timing is Everything!!

Timing is Everything!!

3. Is my message something I need to say now?

If you gotten though the first steps and have come to the conclusion that yes the message needs to be said you you’re the one to do it, you need to remember that timing is key in every aspect of communication. For example say your friend’s grandmother just died and they’ve been posting about it all day, that is probably not a good day to post a funny joke onto their Facebook wall. Maybe the joke is good and on most days your friend would enjoy it, but you’ve got to think of what kind of mental/emotional state your friend is in and if they’re likely to take the joke well.   “Sometimes being a friend means mastering the art of timing. There is a time for silence. A time to let go and allow people to hurl themselves into their own destiny.” ~ Octavia Butler

If you keep these few questions in mind when you attempt to communicate online, you will be far less likely to say something you don’t mean and you’ll also be more capable of saying the things you mean clearly.

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the Day

Exercise of the day:  The 20 Years Exercise

Pick your favorite romantic couple from literature, film, television etc, and write a short story describing their lives 20 years after the end of their story. For example if we ignore the things that happened in Scarlett, the sequel to Gone with the Wind, what might Rhett Butler and Scarlett’s lives be like? Would they have gotten back together? If Romeo and Juliet had lived would they have stayed in love? Just pick a pair and have some fun with it!

So long for now folks!!!!

12 Comments

Filed under Art, Characters, Creative, Creative writing, Dialogue, Ideas, Literature, Movie, Novel Writing, Playwriting, Plot, Screenwriting, Uncategorized, Writing